06.07.2017

Milano Loves Ramen

Hot and steaming in winter or cold and without broth in the summer, Japanese ramen has won Milan over. Here is where to try it in the city

  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen
  • Milano Loves Ramen

Judging from what has been happening in recent times on the Milan restaurant scene, ramen is no longer some niche delicacy for Japanese cuisine experts and enthusiasts, but rather all the rage - just like sushi used to be quite a few years ago.
 
As the number of new restaurants specializing in the preparation of this traditional Japanese (although originally Chinese) bowl of hearty broth filled with noodles increases, people are growing to love it, although for us Westerners it can be pretty complicated to eat - especially for those who just can’t come to terms with the fact that, according to Japanese etiquette, ramen must be eaten quickly and slurped loudly, nonchalant of the occasional spatter.
 
Yet what is it about this dish that allowed it to win even the most fastidious Milanese palates? First of all, it is basically a one-course meal: in its traditional version, it includes fish, meat or pork bone (tonkotsu) stock, wheat noodles and miso, and it is often enriched with seaweed, marinated eggs, sliced ​​roast pork, spring onion and spices.
 
Secondly, there are many different ramen versions, either regional or creative, either more or less spicy, either with meat and or with vegetables. Not to mention the fact that its delicious hot broth is perfect to warm you up in winter, whereas in summer you can try cold ramen, without broth and topped with crisp veggies and meat. In short, this is a dish for all tastes and all seasons.
Here is a list of the best only-ramen places in Milan.
 
Casa Ramen
Oddly enough, the pioneer of ramen-focused restaurants in Milan is actually Italian. His name is Luca Catalfamo and he learned how to master the art of ramen-making in the course of his many journeys to Japan. At his two Milan restaurants, Casa Ramen and Casa Ramen Super (both located in the Isola disctrict), you can try traditional ramen along with a bunch of variations including a brothless and a vegetarian one. The menu also features a small but inviting list of Japanese snacks and bites.
 
Zazà Ramen
Overlooking the central via Solferino, Zazà is another very popular address for ramen in town, offering a laid-back atmosphere and a lot of interesting options; two types of flour for the noodles, three kinds of broth and six different ramen variations, including vegetarian and crab-based ramen. Among the snacks are Japanese gyoza dumplings and glazed chicken wings.
 
Misoya
Also in via Solferino, Misoya is the Italian branch of the Japanese ramen restaurant chain of the same name. It serves traditional ramen in various versions, including spicy, yasay (with mixed veggies) and vegetarian ramen in a casual ambience.
 
Ryukishin
The Milanese home of Japanese chef Tatsuji Matsubara, also owner of the Osaka, Kyoto and Valencia Ryukishin restaurants, is located in via Ariberto (Porta Genova district) and it offers various ramen variations along with a selection of popular Japanese comfort food dishes such as gyoza and fried chicken. Their signature ramen is called paitan ramen and its peculiarity is the creamy chicken and vegetable broth. They also have vegetarian options and a kids’ menu.
 
Bottega del Ramen
Classic, vegetarian or with fish: these are the three ramen variations offered at this new all-ramen Navigli restaurant which marks the Milan debut of the Japanese catering giant Toridoll. The menu also includes a bunch of don (rice and meat) dishes and the summer ramen, served cold and without broth.  
 
Niko Niko Ramen & Sake
From traditional ramen to white or black sesame seed, tomato and cream broth ramen, this great place in via Garibaldi has a creative and fresh approach to its house specialty. Other options include Japanese appetizers, rice-based dishes and onighiri (rice balls with nori seaweeds). Vegetarian and summer ramen are also available.
 
Mi-Ramen Bistrò
At this tiny Porta Ticinese eatery, ramen is served at a bunch of tables with high chairs. Options include pork, shrimp balls and vegetable ramen as well as a list of dim sum bites such as rolls, gyoza and kakuni bao, a steamed bun filled with braised pork belly and vegetables.
 

Author : The Slowear Journal

SlowearTags.

Milan  | ramen  | restaurants  | noodles  | Japanese cuisine  |

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