02.25.2018

A Glimpse into the Homeland of Cider – Bretagne in France

Everything you need to know about French cider

  • A Glimpse into the Homeland of Cider – Bretagne in France
  • A Glimpse into the Homeland of Cider – Bretagne in France
  • A Glimpse into the Homeland of Cider – Bretagne in France
  • A Glimpse into the Homeland of Cider – Bretagne in France

The knowledge of apple cultivation was inherited by the French from both the Celtic Gauls and the Romans who ruled the region for approximately 500 years. We can trace the earliest mentions of cider to the Greek geographer Strabo who speaks of the abundance of apple trees in Gaul and describes a drink very similar to what we know today as cider.
 
Put simply, there are different types of cider like categorised by technique – traditional, farm style, boutique, and pasteurized - each of them with their own, unique flavour. They also come in various hues from colourless or light in color with yellow hues, to dark orange.
 
Some ciders are cloudy with sediment while others are completely clear. Some have a strong taste of apples while others have only a hint. The range of sweetness also has something for every pallet right dry to sweet.
 
The making of this drink is very interesting. Whole apples are ground by the process of crushing the fruit between stone which is the traditional method. The crushed apple pomace is collected in jute/hessian frames and stacked in a cider press. The apple juice is then squeezed out, collected and fermented by use of wild yeast at a temperature of 4–16 °C, commonly in wooden barrels. Like in the case of wines, a second fermentation can also take place, converting the malic acid into a softer tasting lactic acid.
 
A cider may be aged for six months before bottling. The Charmat method is conducted to produce sparkling cider. It is a process of fermenting the apple juice in a sealed tank so as to allow the carbon dioxide that is produced from the fermentation to stay in the cider.
 
To experience first-hand the process of an apple turning into Breton cider, we suggest making a trip to a cider farm. The Cidrerie de la Baie is made up of 7,000 apple trees. The team passionately share the secrets of producing their signature unrivalled organic cider. The lovely tour of the farm ends with a delicious tasting session.
 
If you are interested in buying excellent cider from Brittany, head to the Cornouille region, where most cidreries are located. Here's a list of recommended by IDAC, the Interprofession des Appellations Cidricoles: 
Cidrerie Manoir du Kinkiz 
Cidrerie Melenig
Cidrerie Séhédic 
Le Brun Dominique 
 

Author : The Slowear Journal

SlowearTags.

Cider  | Bretagne  | Apples  | Orchards   |

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