06.26.2019

A Day at The Hara Museum

Originally built as private mansion before the Second World War, the Hara museum is the place to go to, while waiting for the rain season to be over.

  • A Day at The Hara Museum
  • A Day at The Hara Museum
  • A Day at The Hara Museum
  • A Day at The Hara Museum
  • A Day at The Hara Museum

At a 5-minute walk from Shinagawa Station, the Hara Museum opened in 1979 in the former residence of industrialist KunizōHara, under the auspices of the Arc-en-Ciel Foundation. Kunizō held several positions of relevance, including the presidency of Tokyo Gas, Japan Airlines and Teito Rapid Transit Authority(present-day Tokyo Metro), and, likehis adoptive father RokurōHara, he was known to be a keen art collector.
 
Completed in 1938, thehouse was designedin Bauhaus style by Jin Watanabe, who had previously designed the Tokyo National Museumin Ueno and the Ginza Wakobuilding.
 
The semi-circular room, which servedas a breakfast room, is a luminous space with an exterior mosaic tile finish. A caféand a meeting hall were created in the green areaof the courtyard.
 
Every year, the “Hara Annual” exhibitionintroduces the most promising newcomers in the field of contemporary art.
Its permanent collection includes installationsby Jean-Pierre Raynaud, Yasumasa Morimura and Tatsuo Miyajima, as well as works by Minami Tada and Nobuo Sekine, displayed in a space that retains the atmosphere of the pre-war private residence.
 
In 2003 the Hara House was selected  as one of the best examplesof modern architecture in Japanby DoCoMoMo Japan (International Committee for Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites and Neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement).
 
The on-going The Nature Rules: Dreaming of Earth Projectexhibition can be visited until 28th July 2019.
 
In December 2020, the 1938 facilities will be closed for renovation and compliance with barrier-free design standards. With no further ado, let us go and revel in the solemnity of the Japanese pre-war modern movement.
 

Author : Slower Journal

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Tokyo  | Hara Museum  | garden  |

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